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Medco Thyroid Scandal – from Mary Shomon’s site

Posted By on August 7, 2009

This is from Mary Shomon’s About.com site, and her letter to Medco demanding answers to their scandalous (and entirely unethical) letter distributed to doctors nationwide regarding dessicated thyroid products.

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Medco Thyroid Scandal: Thyroid Patients Demand Answers Regarding Misleading Thyroid Drug Shortage Notices
Thursday August 6, 2009
Major mail-order pharmacy Medco Health has recently been disseminating a misleading and highly suspicious notice to doctors, suggesting that no natural desiccated thyroid drugs are available, that the FDA intends to take these drugs off the market, and suggesting that doctors switch patients to levothyroxine. I have obtained a copy of the notice, and have written a letter to the heads of Medco, asking them to explain why they would be telling doctors that natural desiccated thyroid is not available — when it is — and why a pharmacy has taken it upon themselves so suggest to physicians what drugs the doctors should be prescribing to their patients. You can see the Medco notice (PDF), and read my letter now, and talk about it on the Thyroid Forum.

SENT BY FAX AUGUST 6, 2009

August 6, 2009

David Snow, Chairman and CEO
Kenneth Klepper, President and Chief Operating Officer
Medco Health
100 Parsons Pond Dr
Franklin Lakes, NJ 07417-2604
Fax: 201-269-1109

Dear Mr. Snow and Mr. Klepper:

It has come to my attention that you have recently sent out a notification to doctors (see attached), under the heading “Thyroid Products Shortage,” suggesting that there is “a nationwide shortage of products including porcine-derived desiccated thyroid and liotrix.” Your notice states: “These medications do not have U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval, and we expect that the FDA will eventually require these products to be approved and may remove any remaining unapproved products form (sic) the market. Supplies of these products are now limited, because of this uncertainty.”

Your notice then lists all known of natural desiccated thyroid, and indicated that all sizes are “unavailable.”

You then go on to indicate, “When prescribing thyroid therapy consider using levothyroxine.”

Frankly, patients around the United States — and in particular, customers of Medco — are asking themselves what motivation Medco has to provide incorrect and misleading information about thyroid medications. Because your notification is patently incorrect.

Let’s look point by point at Medco’s inaccuracies and misleading statements:

1. Medco states: “there is a nationwide shortage of products including porcine-derived desiccated thyroid and liotrix.”

This is incorrect. There is a nationwide shortage of Armour Thyroid, one brand of porcine-derived desiccated thyroid produced by Forest Labs. And there is a nationwide shortage of Thyrolar, the brand name for liotrix (a synthetic combination thyroid drug), produced by Forest Labs. There is, however, NO nationwide shortage of RLC Laboratories’ natural desiccated thyroid drug, Nature-Throid.

2. Medco states: “These medications do not have U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval.” It’s true that natural desiccated thyroid does not have FDA approval.

Medco’s statement is misleading, however. Natural desiccated thyroid was in use long before the FDA was created, and was “grandfathered in.” Natural desiccated thyroid is a legal, FDA-regulated prescription medication.

3. Medco states: “…we expect that the FDA will eventually require these products to be approved and may remove any remaining unapproved products form (sic) the market.”

This is pure speculation. Medco has no basis on which to “expect” this. Millions of prescriptions each year are written for natural desiccated thyroid, and the FDA has not indicated any intent to remove natural desiccated thyroid from the market, especially given that it has been safely used for more than 100 years.

4. Medco states: “Supplies of these products are now limited, because of this uncertainty.”

This is again speculation, with no basis in fact. Forest Laboratories recently reformulated Armour Thyroid, and has been on backorder since the reformulation. During this time, many patients using natural desiccated thyroid turned to Nature-Throid as a substitute, which created a short-term backorder of Nature-Throid with distributors, which is now being resolved.

5. Medco states, regarding natural desiccated thyroid, that all dosage sizes are “unavailable.”

This is absolutely untrue, as Nature-Throid has availability of all but its 3 grain size. Instead of obtaining the readily available Nature-Throid, Medco is instead misleading doctors by suggesting that no natural desiccated thyroid drugs are available, and that patients should be switched to levothyroxine.

6. Medco states: ” When prescribing thyroid therapy consider using levothyroxine.”

Since when is it the business of a pharmacy to recommend to doctors one particular drug over another, as treatment for patients? If a doctor has prescribed natural desiccated thyroid to his or her patients, it is for a reason, and for those doctors, synthetic levothyroxine is not considered a substitute for therapy with natural desiccated thyroid. Is Medco presuming to know what will treat thyroid patients better than the doctors writing prescriptions?

* * *

Frankly, as a thyroid patient advocate, I find Medco’s conduct entirely unacceptable. It raises the question as to whether Medco is financially benefiting from promoting levothyroxine over natural desiccated thyroid drugs. Given that natural desiccated thyroid is available, unless there is some financial motivation, what reason would Medco possibly have to mislead doctors by suggesting to them that natural desiccated thyroid is unavailable for patients, when that is categorically not the case?

It’s clear that thyroid patients deserve answers to the following questions:

1. Why is Medco unable to obtain Nature-Throid, when other pharmacies are able to obtain it, and the company itself has indicated that supplies are available for immediate shipment to distributors?

2. Why is Medco disseminating incorrect information to doctors, suggesting that there is a nationwide shortage of natural desiccated thyroid drugs, when the shortage is only in one brand?

3. Why is Medco trying to mislead doctors, saying that natural desiccated thyroid does not have U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval, when the company should be well-aware that like many older drugs, natural desiccated thyroid does not require FDA approval, given its grandfathered status and 100 year history of safe use?

4. Why is Medco making predictions about FDA activities when the FDA itself has not discussed any intent to regulate natural desiccated thyroid drugs?

5. Why is Medco trying to link Forest Labs reformulation and backorder difficulties, with FDA plans for natural desiccated thyroid, when no such link is established?

6. Why is Medco saying that no natural desiccated thyroid is available, when Nature-Throid has availability of all but the 3 grain size, and is considered an equivalent to Armour Thyroid for patients taking natural desiccated thyroid?

7. Why is Medco recommending levothyroxine to doctors who have prescribed natural desiccated thyroid for their thyroid patients?

I look forward to Medco’s prompt response to these concerns.

Sincerely,

Mary J. Shomon
Thyroid Patient Advocate

Full article here

http://thyroid.about.com/od/thyroiddrugstreatments/l/MedcoLetter.pdf

Adrenal article: NOTE – Adrenal/Thyroid link…

Posted By on July 30, 2009

This was posted on RTH, thought it worth sharing here.

TREATMENT FOR ADRENAL FATIGUE/ADRENAL EXHUASTION
http://www.ei-resource.org/illness-information/related-conditions/treatment-for-adrenal-fatigue%10adrenal-exhaustion/
As with low thyroid function, many doctors specializing in environmental illnesses have found that many of their patients have poor adrenal function, also known as adrenal fatigue or adrenal exhaustion, and that after taking steps to correct this their condition has improved, sometimes quite dramatically.
The Adrenal Glands
The adrenal glands are located above the kidneys and produce a large number of hormones. The cortex (outer part) produces corticosteroids made from CHOLESTEROL, these include Cortisol, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), Aldosterone and the sex hormones, Testosterone and Estrogen.
Cortisol is the major hormone involved in the stress response. Under prolonged stress cortisol levels are elevated, increasing blood pressure and blood sugar levels and suppressing the inflammatory response of the immune system. DHEA is thought to counteract the negative effects of prolonged high cortisol levels such as immune suppression and damage to brain cells through over stimulation. DHEA levels decline with age which has caused some people to label it as the master anti-aging hormone. This may or may not be the case but in studies it has certainly been shown to increase energy and feelings of well being.
The adrenal medulla (central part) makes adrenaline and noradrenaline, the substances that produce the “fight-or-flight response” when stimulated by the autonomic nervous system, giving that unmistakable short-term burst of energy that enables you to overcome whatever danger is present.
The Adrenal Glands in Environmental Illnesses
According to Dr. Jacob Teitelbaum who has worked extensively with CFS and fibromyalgia patients and had papers detailing his effective treatment regimen published, up to two thirds of sufferers have adrenal fatigue. There are a number of reasons why this may be the case. It has been found that CFS and fibromyalgia patients have low corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH)1. This is a hormone produced by the hypothalamus in the brain that signals the release of another hormone, ACTH, that tells the adrenal glands to increase their hormone output. If CRH is low then adrenal hormones will also be low. Many CFS patients also show a response to ACTH that is similar to that found in secondary adrenal insufficiency disease.

Another reason for low adrenal function could be what is known as adrenal fatigue or adrenal exhaustion. When humans were hunter-gatherers there were large periods of time between exposures to stressful situations in which the body could recover. Nowadays the fight-or-flight response is activated many times a day for most people so the body never gets chance to recover and levels of stress hormones may be chronically raised. Over time the adrenal glands may be unable to keep up this pace of hormone production due to exhaustion of nutritional reserves or damage to the gland itself and the result is low production of adrenal hormones and resulting symptoms of illness such as fatigue. This condition is what is referred to as adrenal fatigue or adrenal exhaustion.

Dr. Teitelbaum notes that one of the first doctors to research stress reactions, Dr. Hans Seyle, found that the adrenal glands of severely stressed animals first begin to bleed and show signs of destruction before the animal finally dies. It may be that the modern human lifestyle for many people produces a less severe form of this. Whatever the cause, be it low CRH causing understimulation of the adrenal glands or adrenal exhaustion, it has been shown in multiple studies that people suffering from CFS, fibromyalgia and other environmental illnesses have low output of the adrenal hormones cortisol and DHEA2, 3, 4.

The Effects of Low Adrenal Function
The are a number of symptoms associated with low adrenal function and they will be familiar to any sufferer of environmental illnesses.

The most common and troublesome include:
Fatigue
• Poor response to stress
• Achiness
• Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar)
• Low blood pressure and dizziness upon standing up
• Recurrent and persistent infections

Some of the main jobs of the adrenal glands are to regulate arousal and control blood sugar levels so these symptoms are what you would expect when they are functionally below normal levels.

Testing Adrenal Function
Many of the testing laboratories mentioned throughout this site offer diagnostic tests for adrenal function. These usually involve taking saliva samples at set times throughout the day at home and sending them back to the lab for analysis. Several samples are needed at different times as adrenal hormone levels naturally rise and fall during the day. These tests indicate levels of cortisol and DHEA/DHEA-S (the sulphur salt of DHEA) and a result indicating low levels would indicate that therapy aimed at increasing adrenal activity may be beneficial. These tests are easy to complete and relatively inexpensive.
More on adrenal function tests here
Home adrenal function (stress check) tests available from our store

Treating Low Adrenal Function
If you are found to have low adrenal function there are a number of options available for treating the problem. Many of these treatments will also help with many other problems associated with environmental illnesses as well.

Treating Hypoglycemia As mentioned earlier the adrenals are involved in maintaining blood sugar levels and low adrenal function leads to low blood sugar. Treating hypoglycemia will relieve, to some extent, symptoms such as fatigue, brain fog, headaches, lightheadedness, dizziness, muscles aches, spaced out feelings. It will also take stress off the adrenal glands and allow them recover somewhat, which in turn will also help maintain blood sugar balance.

Treating hypoglycemia involves adhering to a diet low in fast releasing sugars. These are sometimes difficult to spot on food labels but the general rule is that the names end in ‘ose’, e.g. sucrose, fructose, dextrose.

Basic rules of the hypoglycemic diet are:
• Decrease fast releasing sugar consumption
• Decrease consumption of stimulants such as caffeine
• Increase intake of complex carbohydrates like grains.

A useful supplement for hypoglycemia is glucose tolerance factor (GTF) chromium. A dose of 200-300 micrograms (mcg) twice a day is usual.

Herbs and Nutrients

There are quite a few herbs and nutrients that may benefit adrenal function.
The most widely used are:
Licorice – Contains a compound called glycyrrhizin which raises the body’s level of cortisol by inhibiting its breakdown5. As such licorice acts as an adrenal stimulant. A common dosage is 2-3 grams of licorice root (make sure it’s not de-glycyrrhizinated licorice or DGL) twice a day. It is best to use licorice only for a maximum of 8 weeks before tapering off the dosage as it can raise cortisol levels too high and cause high blood pressure as well as interfere with fluid balance if taken chronically due to its effect on mineralcorticoid hormones.

Asian Ginseng (Panax Ginseng) – It is important here to remember the ‘asian’ part of the name as different types of ginseng have different effects. Asian ginseng improves adrenal function and increases blood pressure and energy. In one large placebo controlled study, the subjects taking asian ginseng experienced a noticeable increase in energy and concentration over a 6 week period.

Panax ginseng has been shown to have a strong anti-stress effect, reducing high cortisol levels and bringing the ratio of cortisol to DHEA to a more healthy balance (6,7). Cortisol has damaging effects when it is chronically raised, these include immune-suppression and nerve cell damage. Typical dosage is 100mg twice per day. If you can’t find asian ginseng then 2-3g of dry, powdered root of Siberian ginseng should have a similar effect.
Echinacea – This herb is best known for its immune stimulating activity and has been the subject of numerous scientific studies. However, it is also claimed to have an adrenal stimulating action so may benefit people with low adrenal function. Published support for this is less apparent than that for licorice and ginseng however (8). Echinacea is available a a wide range of different forms so it is best to follow the directions on the packaging. It is wise to supplement vitamin C along with echinacea for treating low adrenal function as adrenal levels will otherwise decrease as the glands requirement increases due to the stimulation produced by the herb. 500-2000mg of vitamin C per day should be sufficient.
Relora® – A herbal preparation produced by Next Pharmaceuticals. The company states that 50 plant fractions were screened in the pursuit of the best anti-stress effects. Relora® is a combination of a patented extract of Magnolia officinalis and a patent-pending extract from Phellodendron amurense. Both of these herbs have a centuries long history of use in traditional Chinese medicine where their indications include improving general feelings of wellbeing and balancing blood sugar levels. The combination of the extracts in Relora® produce a supplement with potent stress reducing and adrenal hormone balancing effects by binding to important stress related receptors in the nervous system.. Relora® has similar subjective effects on sleep and anxiety as tranquilizer medications such as the benzodiazepines (Valium, Xanax), but without any of the potential side-effects such as sedation and addiction. As such, Relora® is a very effective natural sleep aid. More importantly in the context of this page, studies have shown that Relora® has the ability to balance the adrenal hormones, cortisol and DHEA, moving them away from a stress profile to more healthy levels. In a small trial commissioned by Next Pharmaceuticals, cortisol and DHEA levels in 12 patients with mild to moderate stress were measured. As discussed earlier, raised cortisol and lowered DHEA levels are associated with chronic stress. After 2 weeks of Relora® supplementation at 600mg per day, in divided doses, study participants showed a significant increase in salivary DHEA of 227% and a significant decrease in morning salivary cortisol levels of 37%. Relora® caused the levels of both hormones to return to the normal healthy range in all subjects during the 2 week trial. Findings from Next’s trials regarding the anti-anxiety effects of Relora® have also been backed up by published research from independent researchers13. Relora® has no known side-effects and is reasonably priced. Many ‘anti-stress formulas’ now contain Relora® as well as other herbs and nutrients.

Hormone Replacement
The most direct way to treat low adrenal function is by taking tablets of the hormones that are deficient.
DHEA – If your DHEA-S levels are low then taking DHEA is likely to produce an improvement in your symptoms. Numerous studies have found DHEA-S levels to be low in CFS patients and also that taking DHEA improves many symptoms of environmental illnesses, most notably fatigue, mood and general feelings of well being (9, 10, 11). Many people describe feeling better in general, both physically and mentally. DHEA is available over the counter as a nutritional supplement in the US and can be easily purchased online. Most doctors who use it recommend starting at 5-25mg per day and increasing slowly to the point that feels best to the individual. Doses of 200mg have been used in studies and have shown no significant side-effects in the short-term.
Long term data is scarce however, so caution should be used if you take DHEA over a long period. Women should tend toward the lower end of the dosage range whereas men can take more. It is recommended that DHEA-S levels be tested periodically so they don’t increase above normal levels.

It should be cautioned that DHEA converts into the sex hormones estrogen and testosterone and therefore potentially has the risks associated with an excess of these hormones which include facial hair growth in women and hair loss in men with high testosterone levels and menstrual irregularities in women and stronger expression of feminine characteristics in men when estrogen levels are high.

Some doctors also do periodic liver function tests as some studies have shown that extremely high doses of DHEA can cause liver damage in animal subjects. People with existing liver problems should be especially wary of this and should think about using a sublingual form so less is entering the liver at the same time. DHEA supplements have the advantage of being cheap.

7-Keto DHEA – A derivative of DHEA and is said to be safer due to the fact that it can’t be converted to the sex hormones testosterone and estrogen. Proponents of 7 keto suggest that at the same dose as DHEA, 7 keto has an equal or even stronger immune enhancing, memory enhancing and stress reducing action. However, clinical studies are lacking at this time so no definitive information can yet be given regarding its effectiveness or safety.

Hydrocortisone – This is the synthetic form of cortisol and is available only by prescription. If your cortisol levels are low then it is worthwhile trying low dose hydrocortisone treatment. Doctors prescribing this this therapy typically use doses in the range 2.5-20mg per day. A number of studies have shown that low dose hydrocortisone is effective for treating CFS in many patients (12). Low cortisol levels result in fatigue, low blood pressure, poor immune function (as does high cortisol), hypoglycemia and an increased likelihood of having allergies and chemical sensitivity as well as an inability to deal with stress, to name the most prominent symptoms.

It should be noted that the doses used to treat CFS and other environmental illnesses are well below those used in adrenal insufficiency diseases. Many doctors are unwilling to use hydrocortisone for anything other than in cases of full blown adrenal disease as there is a risk takin hydrocortisone may cause the adrenal glands to produce even less of its own cortisol as its production is controlled by a feedback mechanism. Research on this matter is currently conflicting but it is wise to be cautious and use the lowest dose possible for the least amount of time possible. Hydrocortisone should be taken under the care of a doctor only.

The Adrenal – Thyroid Link
In the early stages of adrenal exhaustion cortisol levels become chronically raised and DHEA levels start to decline. This situation has a negative impact upon thyroid function since cortisol is directly antagonistic to thyroid function.
Presumably, this is the body’s way of conserving energy by reducing thyroid activity and thus slowing down metabolism. Cortisol reduces thyroid activity by reducing stimulation of the thyroid gland through decreased output of Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH) from the pituitary. It also acts to stop the conversion of the thyroid hormone T4 (thyroxine) into the active form, T3.

Low thyroid function can have a host of consequences for health and wellbeing. To learn more see our thyroid page
Last Updated ( Friday, 23 November 2007 )

First Magazine article on Thyroid and Armour

Posted By on April 28, 2009

Caught this in the check out at the store tonight, HAD to pick it up. Had Tim scan it and email to me.

armour-article

Ultimate quote of the day — thanks sammi sis!

Posted By on March 19, 2009

“Whatever you give a woman, she will make greater.

If you give her sperm, she’ll give you a baby.

If you give her a house, she’ll give you a home.

If you give her groceries, she’ll give you a meal.

If you give her a smile, she’ll give you her heart.

She multiplies and enlarges what is given to her.

So, if you give her any crap, be ready to receive a ton of shit.” Red Hatblowkiss

New Element Discovered!

Posted By on February 16, 2009

Lawrence Livermore Laboratories has discovered the heaviest element yet known to science.

The new element, Governmentium (Gv), has one neutron, 25 assistant neutrons, 88 deputy neutrons, and 198 assistant deputy neutrons, giving it an atomic mass of 312.

These 312 particles are held together by forces called morons, which are surrounded by vast quantities of lepton-like particles called peons.

Since Governmentium has no electrons, it is inert; however, it can be detected, because it impedes every reaction with which it comes into contact. A tiny amount of Governmentium can cause a reaction that would normally take less than a second, to take from four days to four years to complete.

Governmentium has a normal half-life of 2- 6 years; It does not decay, but instead undergoes a reorganization in which a portion of the assistant neutrons and deputy neutrons exchange places.

In fact, Governmentium’s mass will actually increase over time, since each reorganization will cause more morons to become neutrons, forming isodopes.

This characteristic of moron promotion leads some scientists to believe that Governmentium is formed whenever morons reach a critical concentration. This hypothetical quantity is referred to as critical morass.

When catalyzed with money, Governmentium becomes Administratium, an element that radiates just as much energy as Governmentium since it has half as many peons but twice as many morons.